A REVOLUTIONARY BREATHING SYSTEM

designed to give someone trapped in a fire an excellent chance to survive until firefighters arrive.

#1 CAUSE OF DEATH

The number one cause of death related to fires is smoke inhalation. 

2-10 MINUTES

Depending on the density and heat of the smoke, it may take 2 to 10 minutes to pass out or die.

STAY PUT

According to fire safety standards, staying in place is often the safest strategy during a fire.

IN AN EMERGENCY,
THIS IS YOUR LIFELINE

Highrise Lifeline connects to your building’s protected fresh air through your plumbing. If you become trapped inside during a fire, Highrise Lifeline attaches to your bathroom’s drain system in 20-seconds or less and provides you with oxygen while you wait for help to arrive.

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SIMPLE. SMART. SAFE.

The primary way smoke inhalation kills is through suffocation from a lack of oxygen. A 21% oxygen level is considered normal. At 17%, there are impairments, and at 9%, people can go unconscious. When the oxygen level is at 6%, that is when cardiac arrest or even death can occur.

SIMPLE

Simply open the elbow in your sink and attach your life saving device.

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SMART.

Fresh air will flow indefinitely, giving firefighters time to reach you safely.

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SAFE

Safe to breathe due to the displacement of all pollutants with clean air.

AT LEAST 38 INJURED IN HIGH-RISE FIRE IN MANHATTAN 
Smoke Inhalation to Blame 

Firehouse Gear

A fire broke out in Tyler Baron’s 14th-floor unit at the Cedar High Apartments. If it had stayed there, everyone in the Minneapolis public housing high-rise probably could have escaped with their lives.

Instead, an improper door seal, a lack of sprinklers and an antiquated stairwell design allowed flames and smoke to spread rapidly, killing Baron and four other residents, according to a yearlong investigation by the Minnesota Fire Marshal’s Office. A sixth resident died months later of COVID-19, with smoke inhalation as a significant factor.

For the families still grieving those lost in the fire on Nov. 27, 2019, they hope the conclusions about what led to the tragedy will prevent future deaths.

“There’s enough unforeseen things in this world that we really can’t prevent, I know this, but there are a lot of things we can,” said David Stuart, who lost his brother Jerome “Jay” Stuart.

Minnesota fire officials suspect there are dozens of similarly vulnerable buildings throughout the state. For decades, they have pushed to require owners of old buildings to upgrade their safety features, including installing sprinkler systems.

(CNN)All 17 victims from a fire in a Bronx apartment building on Sunday died of smoke inhalation, according to the New York City Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME).

The manner of death was determined to be an accident for them all, said OCME director of public affairs Julie Bolcer.
The determination comes after an electric space heater sparked a fire in a duplex unit, flooding the 19-story apartment building with smoke.
Several space heaters had been running for days inside the apartment where the deadly fire started, a fire official told CNN. The heaters, including the one that sparked the blaze, were discovered after firefighters sifted through the rubble, the official said.
Fire officials said that the smoke was able to spread because the door of that apartment and the door from the stairwell to the 15th floor were left open, even though the doors were supposed to close automatically.
Eight of the victims were children, including a 2-year-old boy, two 5-year-old girls and a 6-year-old boy. 

In 2019, an early morning fire at the Cedar High Apartments

"Firefighters quickly recognized the magnitude of the challenge and immediately called for backup. The first three firefighters on scene attacked the fire and attempted to rescue victims, but the overwhelming heat of the fire soon forced them to turn back. As backup arrived, the firefighters launched a second attack, but the fire quickly spread throughout the 14th floor and on to units on higher floors, fueled by gusting winds blowing through a window that had come open.

As the fire spread, residents clamored to get out. Stairwells and corridors filled with smoke and heat, and people struggled to get down the high-rise stairs.

For hours, brave firefighters battled the blaze and worked to rescue people from the inferno. It is tragic that not everyone made it out safely that frigid morning. Five residents, ranging in age from 32 to 79, perished. Four were on the 14th floor, and one on the 17th floor.

AS SEEN ON

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"ALL 17 VICTIMS OF BRONX APARTMENT FIRE, INCLUDING 2-YEAR-OLD, DIED OF SMOKE INHALATION, NYC MEDICAL EXAMINER RULES"